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Calendula officinalis

(Common name:- Marigold)

Classification

Calendula officinalis

History

Calendula officinalis has long and rich history. The tales of this plant’s therapeutic power goes back to the ancient Rome and Greece.

The Greeks used to drink marigold tea to reduce stress.

The plant is said to be able to cure insomnia. In the ancient age people used to consider this plant as a symbol of good luck.

It is said that marigold is one of oldest flowers which had been cultivated in the garden.

The ancient Greeks used the petals of this flower to color food and cloths. In the early 12th century, this plant had been cultivated in the Europe.

Plant Description

Calendula officinalis is famously known as marigold. This is a perennial plant. The plant is short lived and does not grow beyond 80cm.

It is naturally aromatic with upright stem. Leaves of this plant are hairy and grow 5-17 cm long.

June and October is the flowering season of this plant. The flowers usually come in bright yellow or orange in color.

Cultivation

Calendula officinalis grows easily. It can be cultivated directly from the seeds. The right time for cultivation is from spring to summer.

Calendula officinalis can withstand poor soil condition. This plant requires plenty of sun light to grow.

However, this can tolerate a partially shady area. What the plant needs to grow properly is ample watering.

People have been known to grow this plant in the pot at the front yard or doorstep.

Parts Used

Dried Marigold Flowers, Dried Marigold Petals, Leaves & Roots

Chemical Constituents

Calendula officinalis is enriched with many constituents. The petals of this flower contain high percentage of triterpenoid esters and carotenoids flavoxanthin.

The leaves and stems are loaded with carotenoids, mostly lutein (80%) and zeaxanthin (5%), and beta-carotene. The extract of the plant contains saponins, resins and essential oils.

Uses

Names





Disclaimer: The site does not advice you to take any action, we only provide information based on research done by various people world wide. One should consult their doctor, physician or an expert before taking any action or herbal/natural remedy mentioned on this website.


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